Climate Mixtape: 2024 Earth Day joy

Happy Earth Day! This year, we’re celebrating joy. We speak to our Climate Curious experts about moments of joy that keep them going. Recorded live at TED 2024 in Vancouver, on the shared, unceded, ancestral territories of the səl̓ílwətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh), xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), and Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) nations.

Why the insurance industry could be the key to ending fossil fuels

Insurance. Yes, it’s geeky, it’s niche. But it’s the secret lever we never knew we needed. The insurance world holds the keys to halt new fossil fuel projects in their tracks. That’s because if you can’t insure the work, it can’t go ahead. TEDxLondon’s Climate Curious speaks to two campaigners from Insure our Future, Isabelle L’Héritier and Hilda Flavia Nakabuye on the wins from their recent week of global action across 31 countries and five continents.

Climate Quickie: Why city birdwatching is still having a moment

“The beauty of birding is even if you don’t see anything, it’s just about getting outside with your mates and having a good time,” says Nadeem Perera, birdwatcher and co-founder of global birdwatching community, Flock Together, on TEDxLondon’s Climate Curious. Nadeem shares why black and brown representation in nature is old news, and instead, why creativity, self-expression and leadership is the new goal.

Why pollution hits women and girls hardest

Understand the drivers behind why climate change is increasing the incidence of child marriage with the CEO of Girls Not Brides, Dr Faith Mwangi-Powell, on the latest Climate Curious. Climate change is increasing the incidence of child marriages, shares this week’s quickie expert Dr Faith Mwangi-Powell the CEO of Girls Not Brides. Tune in to discover how globally, every year, 12 million girls are married below the age of 18. That’s one girl every three seconds. And why crop failure, drought and extreme weather is pushing families to look for income outside their natural resources.

Climate Quickie: Why a hotter planet means more malaria. Here’s the solution.

What does malaria have to do with climate change? In short, a hotter planet means more bugs. And more extreme weather events means more flood water, which mosquitos adore. But thanks to incredible efforts, lots of solutions are in action to help right the historic injustice of malaria, which sits right at the intersection of climate and health. United to Beat Malaria’s and United Foundation’s executive director Margaret McDonnell joins Climate Curious to share the progress.

Climate Quickie: How do you photograph air pollution?

Photos can convey a message in an instant. But how do you photograph something which day-to-day is invisible to see: air pollution? A new stunning collection of photography on air pollution is compelling action on climate change. From the bustling streets of Indonesia to the industrial heartlands of Poland, these photos capture the stark effects of dirty air on the communities hit hardest, as well as spotlighting solutions already making a difference to people. Climate Curious speaks to Alastair Johnstone from Climate Outreach to discuss why the ways we visualise climate issues really matters.

Climate Quickie: Live, love, laugh climate change?

We’re all living through climate change. So who says we can’t laugh through it, too? Humour is one of the healthiest ways to process the collective tragedy of the pollution of our planet, says the comedian-in-residence at Generation180 and co-creator of the Climate Comedy Cohort, Esteban Gast, on Climate Curious. In conversation with Ben Hurst and Maryam Pasha, Esteban shares some climate jokes live from the comedy stage, plus how he’s building a climate comedy movement to get more climate plots into funny storytelling.

Is there anything funny about climate change?

Short answer: no. Long answer: maybe? Humour is one of the healthiest ways to process the collective tragedy of the pollution of our planet, says the comedian-in-residence at Generation180 and co-creator of the Climate Comedy Cohort, Esteban Gast, on Climate Curious. In conversation with Ben Hurst and Maryam Pasha, Esteban shares how he’s building a climate comedy movement to get more humour into storytelling about what’s going on with our polluted planet.